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Clinical Views

The Truth About Incontinence

The Truth About Incontinence

Sept 25, 2012 - In an interview on Channel 4's New York Live, Urogynecologist Lisa Dabney, MD, debunks several myths about urinary incontinence.

FDA Reports to Patients on Risks of Vaginal Mesh
March 27, 2013

The FDA wants patients with pelvic-organ prolapse to know that having a surgery with transvaginal mesh may put you at risk for needing additional surgery, and in some cases, repeat surgery may not resolve complications. Click here for the full patient advisory PDF.

Controversies in the Field of Urogynecology: Mesh Used in Vaginal Surgery

Message from the Urogynecology Division, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mount Sinai St. Luke’s and Mount Sinai West

An ongoing public controversy was stimulated by the FDA’s 2011 warning regarding the use of synthetic mesh in vaginal surgery for prolapse.

As a matter of fact, departmental urogynecologists Lisa Dabney, MD, and Anne Hardart, MD, have never used much mesh in their practices. They have been especially reluctant to use mesh to augment pelvic-organ-prolapse repairs performed through the vaginal route. Fortunately, they have extensive expertise in performing these procedures vaginally without the use of mesh—and they have had excellent results.
Read full story here.

Grooming Tips for GYN Health

Barely-there underwear, Brazilian bikini waxes, and shaved pubic hair have become cultural beauty standards for women. And yet, the skin of a woman’s genital area is more sensitive than the skin on her face. Lisa Dabney, MD, urogynecologist in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Mount Sinai West Hospital Center, wants to remind women that redness and irritation from harsh grooming procedures and tight clothing are the body’s way of saying “stop torturing me.” Here are the general guidelines that Dr. Dabney hands out to her patients with pain and discomfort in the vaginal area and recurrent yeast infections. Most of the time, says Dr. Dabney, these patients don’t have some horrible infection; they just need to change their grooming habits.


Urogynecology Physicians

Lisa Dabney, MD

Faculty Attending Physician

Office Location 425 West 59th Street, Suite 9B, New York, NY 10019; (212) 523-7570.
Insurance Plans
Board Certifications

Obstetrics and Gynecology

Urogynecology and Pelvic Reconstructive Surgery

Education
  • 1990 BA, Biochemistry, Columbia University
  • 1995 MD, University of California, Los Angeles
  • 1995-1999 Ob/Gyn Residency, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School
  • 1999-2000 Fellow, Urogynecology and Reconstructive Surgery, New York University-Bellevue Medical Center
Academic Appointment  
Special Interests or Skills
  • Surgical and nonsurgical management of pelvic organ prolapse and urinary incontinence
  • Laparoscopic surgery

Dr. Lisa Dabney has been a faculty member of the Division of Urogynecology since 2000; in addition, she was an assistant clinical professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Columbia University College of Physicians and surgeons until 2013. She is a native New Yorker who attended Columbia College as an undergraduate before earning her medical degree from the University of California at Los Angeles. She then completed her residency in obstetrics and gynecology in Boston, at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, a teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School. Subsequently, she received fellowship training in urogynecology and pelvic reconstructive surgery with the noted Dr. Robert Porges, at New York University-Bellevue Medical Center. She is board certified in Urogynecology and Pelvic Reconstructive Surgery, as well as Obstetrics and Gynecology, with the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology. She is a Fellow of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

Dr. Dabney’s Insurance Plans

Dr. Dabney is an in-network provider with the following insurance plans. Please make sure yours is listed. In addition, when you make your appointment with Dr. Dabney, please double-check that she participates as an in-network provider with your plan.

Dr. Dabney's Insurance Plans (pdf)

OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Home
OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Contacts
OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Clinical Services

OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Division Overview
OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Physicians
OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Appointments
OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Types of Urinary Incontinence
OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians About Prolapse
OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Treatments for Incontinence & Prolapse
OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Minimally-Invasive Surgery for Other GYN Problems

Types of Urinary Incontinence

Your doctor will work with you to determine the type of incontinence, so that you can receive appropriate therapy.

Stress Incontinence: Loss of urine during exertion, such as coughing, laughing, or running.

Urge Incontinence: Loss of urine for no apparent reason after suddenly feeling the need or urge to urinate.

Mixed Incontinence: A combination of stress and urge incontinence.

About Pelvic Organ Prolapse

Pelvic organ prolapse is the dropping or falling of the uterus, bladder, rectum, or vagina.



Uterine Prolapse: Pelvic support structures break down and the uterus drops into the vagina. Most often, other organs are also out of place.

Anterior wall prolapse, or cystocele: This is the most common type of pelvic floor defect. The bladder drops and rotates into the vaginal opening, and sometimes bulges out. Some cystoceles can cause urine leakage while large cystoceles can cause difficulty voiding.

Posterior wall prolapse, or rectocele: This condition can result in the rectum bulging into the vaginal opening. A large rectocele can make it difficult to move the bowels.
 
Pelvic prolapse images and captions
used by permission of Ethicon Women’s Health and Urology, a Johnson and Johnson Company.

Treatments for Incontinence & Prolapse: