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Research

Recent Publications by the Mount Sinai St. Luke’s and Mount Sinai West OB/GYN Department

OB/GYN faculty, fellows, and residents at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s and Mount Sinai West have given birth in the last 2 months to a variety of scholarly publications, reviewing the role of minimally-invasive surgery in ovarian cancer, investigating factors that predict IVF success or failure, optimizing methods of pre-implantation embryo biopsy and genetic screening during IVF, comparison-testing methods for labor induction, and characterizing fetal uterine development.

Nezhat FR, Pejovic T, Finger TN, Khalil SS. Role of minimally invasive surgery in ovarian cancer. J Minim Invasive Gynecol. 2013 Nov-Dec;20(6):754-65.

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Thompson SM, Onwubalili N, Brown K, Jindal SK, McGovern PG. Blastocyst expansion score and trophectoderm morphology strongly predict successful clinical pregnancy and live birth following elective single embryo blastocyst transfer (eSET): a national study. J Assist Reprod Genet. 2013 Dec;30(12):1577-81.

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Keltz MD, Sauerbrun-Cutler MT, Durante MS, Moshier E, Stein DE, Gonzales E. Positive Chlamydia trachomatis serology result in women seeking care for infertility is a negative prognosticator for intrauterine pregnancy. Sex Transm Dis. 2013 Nov;40(11):842-5.

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Mrkaic AG, Petrovic AS, Nezhat FR, Trandafilovic M, Vlajkovic S, Vasovic LP. Some features of the developmental uterus in human fetuses. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2013 Nov 18. Epub ahead of print; PMID: 24168155.

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Keltz MD, Vega M, Sirota I, Lederman M, Moshier EL, Gonzales E, Stein D. Preimplantation Genetic Screening (PGS) with Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) following day 3 single cell blastomere biopsy markedly improves IVF outcomes while lowering multiple pregnancies and miscarriages. J Assist Reprod Genet. 2013 Oct;30(10):1333-9.

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Suffecool K, Rosenn BM, Kam S, Mushi J, Foroutan J, Herrera K. Labor induction in nulliparous women with an unfavorable cervix: double balloon catheter versus dinoprostone. J Perinat Med. 2013 Oct 4:1-6.

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Research Presentations at National and International Conferences
By Obstetrics and Gynecology Department Faculty and Clinical Staff

Poster Title
(Click the link to view PDF)

Authors

Annual Meeting

Date

City

Is Thyroid Dysfunction a Frequent
Co-Morbidity in Gestational Diabetes?
Scarpelli-Havranik S, Lee D,
Brustman L, Rosenn B, Lurie H, Langer O
5th International Symposium on Diabetes and Pregnancy Mar. 09 Sorrento, Italy
Fetal Midtrimester Liver Volume and
Fetal Birthweight

Lysikiewicz A, Pietryga M, Langer O

Society for Gynecologic Investigation Mar. 09 Sorrento, Italy
Fetal Liver Volume in Second and Third Trimester of Pregnancy

Pietryga M,
Lysikiewicz A, Langer O

Society for Gynecologic Investigation March 2009 Glasgow, Scotland
Can USMLE Scores Predict Resident Performance on the CREOG In-Training Examination? Brustman L, Williams F, Carroll K, Deli B, Francis M, Langer O Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology Mar. 09

San Diego, California

What is the Better Predictor for Performance on the ABOG Written Exam: USMLE Exam vs. CREOG In-Training Examination Scores
Brustman L, Williams F, Carroll K, Deli B, Francis M, Langer O Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology Mar. 09

San Diego, California

Does Maternal Weight Gain in Gestational Diabetes Affect Fetal Growth? Simmonds L, Teixeira L, Brustman L, Playforth K, Salafia C, Rosenn B Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine Jan. 09 San Diego, California
Does Use of Cervidil Change Electrical Uterine Activity During Induction of Labor?
Playforth K, Langer O, Farinelli C, Ben-David G, Calderon I Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine
Jan. 09 San Diego, California
Electrical Uterine Activity in Induced Labor Compared to Spontaneous Labor Playforth K, Langer O, Farinelli C, Ben-David G, Calderon I. Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine Jan. 09 San Diego, California
The True Risk of Adverse Pregnancy Outcome Following Genetic Amniocentesis Lysikiewicz A, Yeboa A, Brustman L, Jaffe R, Langer O Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine January 2009

San Diego,

California
Manual Vacuum Aspiration: Early Detection of Products of Conception Steward R, Salafia C, Ganz E Association of Reproductive Health Sept. 08 Wasington, DC
Fetal Central Obesity Measured by VOCAL in Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Patients Lysikiewicz A, Pietryga M, Rosenn B, Jaffe R, Langer O Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine Jan 08 Dallas, Texas


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Placental Perfusion Research Laboratory

The Placental Perfusion Laboratory (PPL) is located in the Maternal-Fetal Evaluation Unit of the Department of OB/GYN. The PPL is a single cotyledon human perfusion model. The dual perfusion apparatus has independent systems to maintain homeostasis in both maternal and fetal perfusate circulations. This system provides an in-vitro transport model in the intact human placental cotyledon. It's main advantage is the ability to test human placental transport, uptake, and metabolism independent of fetal effects. This system allows for the assessment of net flux in either the maternal to fetal or fetal to maternal direction, saturation kinetics, and transport against concentration gradients. Because variables such as temperature, acid/base balance, perfusion rate and pressure, substrate concentration, and composition of the perfusate solutions can be controlled in this model, flexibility of study design can be achieved. Abnormal or normal human placentas can be tested in normal and abnormal maternal or fetal environments, and findings compared with clinical information obtained either on the fetus or placenta in-utero. Multiple agents can be tested simultaneously to determine interactive effects on net transport and uptake. The laboratory facilities in the Department of OB/GYN include liquid scintillation spectrometry and high performance liquid chromatography. Either radio-labeled or unlabeled substances tested in the single cotyledon model can be assayed. Placental uptake can be determined by homogenization of the perfused cotyledon and assayed by the above techniques. Abnormalities or changes in placental architecture can be demonstrated by electron microscopy available to the Department.

OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Publications - have not linked yet



HIV/AIDS Center for Comprehensive Care

Dr. Victoria Sharp, Director

The Mount Sinai St. Luke’s and Mount Sinai West Center, housed in the 16,000 square-foot Samuels Center for Comprehensive Care provides primary care for adults and children including gynecological, dental, mental health, and nutritional care. Outpatient services include HIV counseling and testing, financial resource coordination, primary medical care, oral medical services, substance abuse interventions, mental health and psychosocial services as well as methadone maintenance and primary care treatment programs. Because of the extensive patient pool, clinical trials thrive at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s and Mount Sinai West. Patients receiving treatment at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s and Mount Sinai West are routinely assessed for eligibility to participate in clinical trials sponsored by industry and the NIH. Trials are often collaborative efforts with Mount Sinai Medical Center and BIMC. Referrals to clinical trials outside of Mount Sinai St. Luke’s and Mount Sinai West are also available. Funding is used to support the Program for Children and Families (PCF), a family-centered outpatient/inpatient medical care treatment program for children and families infected and affected by HIV/AIDS. The interdisciplinary staff includes pediatricians, adult infectious disease specialists, a gynecologist, psychiatrist, nurses, case managers, a nutritionist, psychologist, child life therapist, and support staff. Most services are available in Spanish as well as English. Pediatric dental services and a program of early identification and intervention services for women, are an integral part of the Mount Sinai St. Luke’s and Mount Sinai West HIV/AIDS Center for Comprehensive Care.

OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Publications - have not linked yet



Animal Research Facilities

The animal research facilities and laboratories at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s and Mount Sinai West are located at three sites: the Clark 10 building, the Babcock 10 Building and the Antenucci Research Pavilion. Overall, 17,321 square feet are dedicated to animal research with administrative support from the Mount Sinai St. Luke’s and Mount Sinai West Institute for Health Sciences. The facilities include four operating rooms, a necropsy laboratory, and cage washing areas. In addition, procedure, storage and conference rooms are available. The facilities are equipped to handle both large (dogs, pigs, etc.) and small (mice, rats and hamsters) animals. The Ovine and barrier maintained rodent research facilities are housed in the Antennucci research pavillon.

OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Publications- have not linked yet



Biochemistry of Steroid Hormones Laboratory

Dr. Seymour Lieberman, PhD, Director

Dr. Lieberman and his colleagues in the Biochemistry of Steroids Laboratory at West Hospital are pioneers in the basic science of steroid biosynthesis. The group was responsible for elucidating many aspects of the biosynthetic pathways by which steroid hormones are produced. They also synthesized steroid-protein conjugates and demonstrated their antigenic and antihormonal properties. The antibodies to these conjugates are presently being used in the radioimmunoassay procedures of most of the steroid hormones. Dr. Lieberman was the first to suggest and provide evidence for the involvement of transient intermediates in steroid biosynthesis; these intermediates probably consist of reactive complexes of the steroids, oxygen, and metalloenzymes, which convert precursors to their end products without the obligatory intermediacy of hydroxylated species. Dr. Lieberman also pioneered the isolation of cholesterol sulfate from natural resources and examined some aspects of its biochemistry, and first isolated approximately fifty steroid metabolites and conjugates from human urine; among those, eight were metabolites of aldosterone. Finally, he developed a simple method for tritium-labeling that is applicable for peptides and proteins (e.g. ACTH, LH, and LHRF). Dr. Lieberman has published over 200 scientific papers.

For these contributions to science, Dr. Lieberman has received numerous honors and awards including the Roussel Prize, the Dale Medal from the United Kingdom Society for Endocrinology, the Distinguished Service Award from Columbia University, and the Boehinger Manneheim Award from the United Kingdom Association of Clinical Biochemists. Dr. Lieberman has taken a series of influential roles during his long and distinguished career. In 1975, he was president of the Endocrine Society, the international organization whose journals are the primary venues of communication within the discipline. From 1970 through 1981, he was Associate Dean of the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons; concurrently, he was president of the Institute for Health Sciences at the Mount Sinai West Hospital Center. In 1981, he became the Associate Director for Science and Technology at Columbia, a position he held until 1993. Dr. Lieberman is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He continues his basic science research into endocrine biochemistry, devoting time and energy toward guiding and directing the next generation of scientists. His laboratory is located at the Antennucci Research Pavillion, and he is a Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Publications - have not linked yet

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OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Placental Perfusion Research Laboratory
OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians HIV/AIDS Center for Comprehensive Care
OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Animal Research Facilities
OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Biochemistry of Steroid Hormones Laboratory
OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Diabetes in Pregnancy
OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Doppler and Placental Blood flow