Bookmark and Share


Mount Sinai St. Luke’s and Mount Sinai West OB-GYN Hosts First-Annual
New York City OB/GYN Resident Bowl Competition

On Saturday, May 21, 2011, in the beautiful and historic surroundings of the New York Academy of Medicine, Mount Sinai St. Luke’s and Mount Sinai West OB/GYN Department sponsored the first annual New York City OB/GYN Resident Bowl. Set up as a trivia game show similar to Jeopardy, the competition orally tested the clinical knowledge of residents from seven hospitals throughout the five boroughs.

Click here to read the full article.


Education Table of Contents:

OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Introduction
OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Educational Objectives
OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians List of Recommended Textbooks
OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Organization and Structure
OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Master Rotation Schedule (on Hold for now)
OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Rotation Descriptions and Educational Guidelines
OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Continuity Clinics
OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Teaching Conferences Schedule
OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Resident Projects



Continuity Clinics

Beginning in the first postgraduate year, each resident will participate in a continuity clinic, and develop a pannel of patients that will be retained throughout the resident's training.

Medicine is changing rapidly. Much of what was once done in the hospital is now done in the office or in other outpatient settings. While outpatient medicine has been traditionally viewed by residents as a nuisance, the office is actually where you will spend the most of your time as a practicing obstetrician and gynecologist. ACOG and CREOG have given outpatient medicine at least the same importance as learning to perform deliveries or hysterectomies. To prepare you for this role, and to serve our clinic patients well, we have established a continuity clinic system, in which the doctor-patient relationship will have continuity over at least a three-year period, if not longer. The name "continuity clinic" represents a philosophy of patient care and a practical way of scheduling patient visits. Basically, we want you to see your continuity clinic session as your private office. Ideally, patients will be initially scheduled for you based on your educational level and expertise, e.g., patients requesting a routine annual exam for contraception will be triaged toward a junior resident while those complaining of more complex issues will be scheduled with an upper-level resident. Obviously, this system is not foolproof, because sometimes the patient is not clear as to what the problem is. For those situations, the faculty member staffing the clinic is available to triage the patient.

The patients assigned to you will remain your patients for the duration of your residency training. In this way, you can learn the art and science of obstetrics and gynecology in a longitudinal fashion. If you are at all open to observation and self-reflection, you will not only learn about the differential diagnosis of abnormal uterine bleeding, you will also learn something about your own personal style of interacting with patients and staff. Further, we believe that satisfaction for you and the patients is improved when there exists an identified doctor/patient relationship rather than simply a nameless, faceless clinic. We urge you to provide your patients with your business card at the time of their first visit. In the same fashion, obstetrical patients who are new to the clinic will be assigned to you for the duration of their prenatal care. It is always your option to attend the delivery of any of your OB patients, assuming that you do not have commitments elsewhere. Ideally, the patient will return to you for her postpartum visit and subsequent health care, regardless of who performs the delivery. Obstetrical patients who develop complications during the antepartum period may require transfer to the high-risk clinic.

There will always be a faculty preceptor in the continuity clinic. All patient-management plans must be reviewed and signed off on by the faculty. The time for your clinic session will change with your various rotations, but its occurrence in you schedule is steadfast. You will spend one-half session per week in your office regardless of rotation, and these sessions take precedence over all other duties. It is important that you arrive on time as a sign of respect to you patients, and also because the clinic is very busy.

Attending Supervision: Attending assigned to that clinic.

Clinical Responsibilities: To care for a panel of obstetrics and gynecology patients for a minimum of three years. These patients are to be provided with obstetrical, gynecological and primary care during this time.

Learning Goals: To 1) perform routine primary care in the ambulatory setting as per ACOG guidelines, including preventive care such as immunizations, preconception counseling, prenatal care, immunizations, family planning, menopausal care and sexuality counseling; 2) provide genetic counseling and prenatal care; 3) manage outpatient gynecological and endocrine problems such as pelvic pain, vulvovaginitis, sexually transmitted diseases, breast disorders, and abnormal uterine bleeding.

Study References: PRECIS, Ambulatory and Reproductive Endocrinology PROLOGS, Williams, Gabbe, Creasy, Speroff, and Droegemüller.


OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Home
OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Contacts
OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Clinical Services


OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Residency Application
OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Residency Manual
OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Education and Conferences
OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Residents
OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Policies
OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Sample Forms
OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Program Requirements
OB Gyn Gynecology St. Luke's Hospital New York Manhattan Pregnancy Risks Specialist Midwife Physicians Contact Information


First Annual NYC OB/GYN Resident Bowl
Eric Ganz, MD, Master of Ceremonies, Center